www.siberiantigernaturals.com

Siberian Tiger Naturals, Inc.
PO Box 66540
Seattle, WA 98166
Phone: 1(206)407-3048(M-F 9.00 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. Pacific Time)
Toll-Free (orders only): 1(877)739-9925
Fax: 1(206)494-7737


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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Extra virgin pine nut oil, peptic ulcers and gastritis

1. What is Extra virgin pine nut oil (EVPO)? Is it safe to use?
2. How does pine nut oil work to heal peptic ulcers and alleviate gastritis-related inflammation?
3. What causes peptic ulcers and gastritis?
4. Were there any clinical studies performed to ascertain the effectiveness of extra virgin pine nut oil as a gastrointestinal remedy?
5. What about H. Pylori? Isn't it enough to kill this "bug" to get rid of peptic ulcers?
6. Does extra virgin pine nut oil relieve ulcer- and gastritis-related abdominal pain?
7. Are there any side effects associated with the use of pine nut oil?
8. My doctor has prescribed antibiotics and antacids for my ulcer. Can I combine extra virgin pine nut oil with these medications?
9. How would the use of pine nut oil react with a person who has had the gallbladder removed?
10. Do have any suggestions for taking your pine nut oil besides just straight?
11. What are free radicals and antioxidants? How do their affect our health?
12. How does our body protect itself from free radicals? What can we do to help it protect itself?
13. What makes extra virgin pine nut oil such a powerful concentrate of antioxidants?
14. How much extra virgin pine nut oil should I take to alleviate pain and heal peptic ulcers?

Extra virgin pine nut oil, metabolism and digestion

15. What is cholecystokinin (CCK)? How does it enhance metabolism and assist digestion?
16. What is pinolenic acid (PNA)?
17. What is the recommended daily dosage of pine nut oil required for optimizing digestion?

18. I do not need to lose any weight. I will be using the oil as a gastrointestinal remedy. Will it suppress my appetite?

Extra virgin pine nut oil, peptic ulcers and gastritis

1. What is Extra virgin pine nut oil (EVPO)? Is it safe to use?

Most pine nuts contain a fairly large amount of edible oil – up to 60% of their total weight. In Russia and China, it has been traditionally cold-pressed from pine nuts collected from wild-growing pines by a delicate process using unique traditional oil presses. The resulting richly fragrant, golden-colored oil with a delicious nutty flavor is called extra virgin pine nut oil (EVPO). The oil is absolutely safe to use. It is both a traditional, centuries-old food and a potent natural remedy against a number of widespread ailments, including peptic ulcers and gastritis.

Extra virgin pine nut oil has a history of many centuries of therapeutic use in Russian and Chinese traditional medicine. It is an outstanding concentrate of powerful free radical scavengers fully capable of preventing or reversing even the strongest oxidative stress.

Nowadays, extra virgin pine nut oil is being widely used by Russian, Chinese and European doctors internally for the treatment of peptic ulcers, gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining) and GERD (acid reflux). They also prescribe it externally to treat burns and bruises and improve skin condition, and use it for therapeutic inhalations, baths, and massages. Along with being a proven peptic ulcer and gastritis healer, extra virgin pine nut oil provides our body with many vital nutrients, including good fats, amino acids (building blocks for proteins), fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants, as well as essential macro- and microelements such as magnesium, zinc, iron, copper, and iodine.

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2. How does pine nut oil work to heal peptic ulcers and alleviate gastritis-related inflammation?

According to recent medical research, gastric and duodenal ulcers, as well as gastritis, remain a serious health problem in the United States and worldwide. During their lifetimes, about 1 in 10 Americans develop at least one ulcer. Ulcers affect about 5 million people each year, and more than 40,000 people annually have ulcer-related surgery. Each year, approximately 15,000 people in the United States die of ulcer-related complications.

There is ample proof of the fact that free radicals play a major role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers and gastritis. All known risk factors for erosive/ulcerative gastric and duodenal disorders – such as smoking, excess alcohol consumption, unhealthy eating habits, physical and emotional stress, etc. – deplete the natural antioxidant shields of the gastroduodenal lining and cause a free radical overload. As a result, the gentle, fragile mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum becomes one of the first tissues to suffer from the damaging chain reactions induced by free radicals. Therefore, many researchers and doctors agree that real, lasting solutions to the problem of peptic ulcers and gastritis are to be found in boosting the body’s weakened antioxidant shields with natural antioxidant complexes.

Extra virgin pine nut oil is an outstanding concentrate of powerful free radical scavengers fully capable of preventing or reversing even the strongest oxidative stress leading to peptic ulcers and gastritis. There is also some evidence suggesting that pine nut oil may be capable of working against peptic ulcers in more than one way, its potent antioxidant activity being just one of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as a natural ulcer remedy. For example, a number of researchers suggest that pinolenic acid - a unique fatty acid occurring exclusively in pine nut oil - provides strong anti-inflammatory and protective effects on gastric and duodenal mucosa. Based on this strong body of research and clinical evidence, the experts invariably agree that extra virgin pine nut oil is an effective, time-tested and proven natural ulcer healer.

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3. What causes peptic ulcers and gastritis?

In the past, it was thought that lifestyle factors, such as alcohol abuse, physical and emotional stress, unhealthy eating habits and smoking, cause peptic ulcers and gastritis. Later, it was also thought that they may be caused by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), although many researchers suggest that the presence of these bacteria in the majority of peptic ulcer patients does not necessarily mean that the bacteria cause ulcers, rather than just add to the severity of the problem (for example, only a small minority of people who have H. pylori in their system ever develop a peptic ulcer). In fact, there is extensive and mounting evidence of the fact that all of the above-mentioned possible causes of ulcer formation merely compound the real underlying cause: free radical damage and oxidative stress.

All known risk factors for erosive/ulcerative gastric and duodenal disorders (for example, the lifestyle-related factors described above) deplete the natural antioxidant shields of our body and cause a free radical overload. Even the much discussed Helicobacter pylori bacteria contributes to the free radical overload by producing an enzyme called urease, the action of which eventually leads to the release of more free radicals, causing damage to the epithelium. As a result, the gentle, fragile mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum becomes one of the first tissues to suffer from the damaging chain reactions induced by free radicals.

Therefore, effective treatment and prevention of peptic ulcers must be based on using the best available natural antioxidant complexes in order to enhance our body's depleted antioxidant shields. One such healing antioxidant complex, abundant in very potent and effective free radical scavengers, is contained in extra virgin Siberian pine nut oil.

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4. Were there any clinical studies performed to ascertain the effectiveness of extra virgin pine nut oil as a peptic ulcer and gastritis remedy?

Yes, there was extensive scientific research and many clinical studies conducted to this effect.

First, there was a number of studies which established the role of free radicals and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers and gastritis and showed that natural antioxidants are capable of stopping and reversing the ulcer-causing free radical damage to the gastric mucosa.

Second, the effectiveness of extra virgin pine nut oil in peptic ulcer and gastritis treatment was specifically established in several studies conducted in Russia and China. In these countries, as well as in several Eastern European countries, extra virgin pine nut oil has now officially been approved as an effective peptic ulcer and gastritis remedy.

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5. What about H. Pylori? Isn't it enough to kill this "bug" to get rid of peptic ulcers?

This is a gross oversimplification of the real facts surrounding the role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastric inflammation and peptic ulcers.

H. pylori and its effects on the human body are still very poorly understood. While promoting the use of a combination of two or more strong antibiotics to get rid of H. pylori, the pharmaceutical industry still cannot explain why only a small portion of those "infected" with these bacteria ever develop even a single peptic ulcer, while the vast majority of these "infected" individuals fail to develop any symptoms whatsoever. In some countries, as many as 90 percent of the population are "infected" with H. pylori, yet the frequency of peptic ulcer disease in these countries is rather limited.

Unlike regular pathogenic bacteria, H. pylori do not invade the cells of the surrounding tissue, they just "habitate" there. Moreover, in sharp contrast to pathogenic bacteria, H. pylori do not cause our immune system to eliminate them or develop immunity to a repeated "infection".

In a large percentage of peptic ulcer sufferers, H. pylori is not even present (these cases are called H. pylori-negative). And isn't it interesting that, in spite of being blamed for 90 percent of all duodenal ulcers, H. pylori is never even present in the duodenum?

Moreover, an increasing number of doctors and medical researchers, led by Dr. Martin Blaser, Professor of Internal Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at NYU and founder of the Foundation for Bacteriology, think that Helicobacter pylori may be protective against gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach cardia - a particularly deadly form of cancer that is becoming more and more widespread. According to Dr. Blaser, H. pylori and humans have co-evolved for many thousands of years, and, until very recently, all humans were colonized by these bacteria. This means that H. pylori must be a long-established part of our normal bacterial flora, or "indigenous biota".

In February 2005, Dr. Martin Blaser has published a landmark article about H. pylori, entitled An Endangered Species in the Stomach, in Scientific American magazine. In this article, he has convincingly demonstrated that the decline of H. pylori in developed countries over the past 100 years has paralleled an upsurge in potentially fatal diseases of the esophagus. Here are some of Dr. Martin's conclusions presented in the article:

"The possibility that this bacterium may actually protect people against diseases of the esophagus has significant implications. For instance, current antibiotic treatments that eradicate H. pylori from the stomach may have to be reconsidered to ensure that the benefits are not outweighed by any potential harm. To fully understand H. pylori's effects on health, researchers must investigate the complex web of interactions between this remarkable microbe and its hosts. Ultimately, the study of H. pylori may help us understand other bacteria that colonize the human body, as well as the evolutionary processes that allow humans and bacteria to develop such intimate relations with one another."

Consequently, the jury is still out with regard to the exact role of Helicobacter pylori in health and disease. While there is a possibility that this bacterium plays a certain role in ulcer development, there is also extensive data supporting the opposite point of view: namely, that these bacteria may, under certain adverse circumstances, become a contributing factor to the disease, but not its underlying cause. And, taking into account the mounting evidence of a protective role played by Helicobacter pylori in relation to esophageal diseases, the currently popular medical practice of wholesale eradication of H. pylori by antibiotics may create more serious problems than the ones it is supposed to solve.

Without doubt, this issue requires a lot of additional research before any final conclusions can be drawn. In any event, it is definitely premature to recommend strong antibiotics as the "default" allopathic cure for peptic ulcers and gastritis, if only because bacteria tend to develop resistance toward antibiotics, leading to the appearance of new, antibiotic-resistant strains. The strongly negative side effects of antibiotics, namely the extermination of the numerous beneficial strains of bacteria, leading to further damage to the gastrointestinal system, should not be overlooked, either. When a so-called "triple therapy" (two antibiotics plus an acid suppressor) is used, patients are required to take up to 20(!) pills a day. Side effects of "triple therapy" include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark stools, metallic taste in the mouth, dizziness, headache, and yeast infections in women.

Another serious and potentially life-threatening condition that sometimes develops after the use of antibiotics is called pseudomembranous colitis. On average, it develops in 0.5 to 4 percent of those treated with antibiotics to eliminate peptic ulcers or gastritis.

As was already noted above, all known risk factors for erosive/ulcerative gastric and duodenal disorders, including smoking, alcohol, stress, and poor diet, deplete the natural antioxidant shields of our body and cause a free radical overload. H. pylori just "adds its two cents" to the total free radical assault on the protective lining of the stomach and the duodenum.

Under normal circumstances, i.e. when the antioxidant status of our body is not compromised or stretched too thin, the natural antioxidant defenses are able to withstand this assault (whether it is caused by H. pylori or not) and keep the fragile gastriduodenal lining from inflammation and ulceration. However, when these antioxidant shields become depleted or otherwise inadequate, our body loses its ability to successfully cope with free radicals, resulting in peptic ulcers. A vivid example of such a situation may often be seen in emergency rooms, where patients who have suffered from head trauma or burns tend to develop peptic ulcers on a massive scale in a matter of days or even hours, because the body is using all of its available antioxidant reserves to fight the life-threatening condition.

The bottom line of this rather long explanation is that the nature and functions of H. pylori are far from being well understood by scientists, but one thing should be clear to any unbiased observer: it definitely should not be viewed as a "bug" that must be killed to cure peptic ulcers. Yes, it may contribute to the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers, but only as one of many other causative factors which may be at work here. Therefore, its elimination does not guarantee anything, because, if the antioxidant shields of the gastroduodenal mucosa continue to be inadequate, sooner or later it will again fall victim to imflammation and ulceration, and peptic ulcers will return.

A much more prudent and effective approach to the healing and prevention of peptic ulcers and gastritis is to boost the antioxidant status of our body with powerful natural antioxidant foods and remedies like extra virgin pine nut oil. If the antioxidant shields are brought back to normal and kept functioning at their fullest potential, they would be able to successfully withstand any free radical pressure, including such pressure that may be caused by Helicobacter pylori. Only through such an optimization of the antioxidant status of our body it is possible to achieve true healing and prevent peptic ulcers from recurring.

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6 . Does extra virgin pine nut oil relieve ulcer- and gastritis-related abdominal pain?

Yes, it does. In some patients, pain relief comes practically right away. In a recent clinical study of 25 peptic ulcer and 5 chronic gastritis sufferers, abdominal pain was completely gone in all 30 patients after 21 days of pine nut oil use.

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7. Are there any side effects associated with the use of extra virgin pine nut oil?

No, there are absolutely no side effects. Extra virgin pine nut oil is a traditional, all-natural healing food which has been used in Russia, Europe, and China for many centuries.

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8. My doctor has prescribed antibiotics and antacids for my ulcer. Can I combine extra virgin pine nut oil with these medications?

First of all, although it is a good idea to consult a qualified health professional with any health problem (we think that, in most situations, a naturopathic physician is the best available choice), you must be informed that all synthetic antibiotics and stomach acid suppressors have very strong and serious side effects.

For example, the antibiotics prescribed to eliminate Helicobacter pylori may fail to destroy their intended target, but are guaranteed to kill billions upon billions of beneficial bacteria in your gastrointestinal tract, effectively annihilating normal gastrointestinal flora. It may take months or even years to bring it back to normal (in some people, this fragile bacterial ecosystem never recovers). Additional side effects associated with the use of antibiotics, to name just a few, are severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.

Synthetic drugs meant to suppress the production of stomach acid have many nasty side effects of their own. It is important to know that, when our stomach loses its ability to produce gastric acid, we become unable to digest protein and assimilate protein-bound vitamins, including vitamin B12. As a result, incompletely digested protein is flushed into the duodenum, leading to food allergies and amino acid deficiencies. A deficiency of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) may lead to anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. Additionally, stomach acid suppressors may cause impotence and breast enlargement in men.

If you still decide to undergo a course of antibiotic/acid suppressor therapy, you may (or, rather, should) definitely combine these medications with extra virgin pine nut oil. Pine nut oil will partially offset the negative consequences of synthetic drugs and provide important pain relief and healing benefits of its own.

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9. How would the use of pine nut oil react with a person who has had the gallbladder removed?

Unless the surgery took place less than a month ago, extra virgin Siberian pine nut oil would be perfectly safe to use in such circumstances. After gallbladder is surgically removed, the bile duct simply enlarges to assume the bile-storing role. Therefore, the additional stimulating effect produced by the oil would not be harmful, while the therapeutic benefits of this oil are truly unique.

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10. Do have any suggestions for taking your pine nut oil besides just straight?

For fastest therapeutic results, we recommend taking pine nut oil straight. If desired, it may be mixed into a drink, or used in a recipe. You will still get a full complement of the healing ingredients present in the oil, but the results may not be as fast.

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11. What are free radicals and antioxidants? How do their affect our health?

Free radicals, also known as “reactive oxygen species” (ROS), are atoms or atomic groups that contain unpaired electrons. Since electrons have a very strong tendency to exist in a paired rather than an unpaired state, free radicals indiscriminately pick up electrons from other atoms, converting those other atoms into secondary free radicals, and thus setting up a chain reaction that can cause substantial biological damage. To protect itself from the damaging action of free radicals, our bodies use substances called antioxidants, which are also often referred to as free radical scavengers.

Many scientists think that the process of aging is caused by the indiscriminate chemical re-activity of free radicals leading to random biological damage. If the free radical overload becomes overwhelming, premature aging and degenerative diseases result. This hypothesis was confirmed by many practical experiments, and it is now considered a major theory of aging.

In addition to premature aging, the destructive effects of free radical chain reactions may be conducive to the development of such widespread and serious health conditions as gasritis and peptic ulcers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infertility, renal, liver and lung disease, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Free radicals may damage DNA and cause it to reproduce incorrectly, too rapidly, or not at all. They can also change DNA to produce potential carcinogens.

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12. How does our body protect itself from free radicals? What can we do to help it protect itself?

Our body has developed several endogenous antioxidant systems to deal with the production of free radicals. These systems may be divided into enzymatic and non-enzymatic groups. The enzymatic antioxidants include superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. SOD catalyzes the breaking down of a free radical called superoxide, which plays a major role in lipid peroxidation, into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, which is further decomposed into water and oxygen by catalase. Glutathione peroxidase is also used by the body to consume free peroxide in the cells.

It is very important to note that, for maximum efficiency, these antioxidant enzymes require trace metal cofactors. SOD, for example, consists of proteins cofactored with copper, zinc, manganese or iron. Iron is also required as a cofactor for catalase.

The most well-researched non-enzymatic antioxidants include lipid-soluble vitamin E, vitamin A and carotenoids (including beta-carotene), as well as water-soluble vitamin C and glutathione (GSH). Glutathione, which is synthesized intracellularly from amino acids cysteine, glycine, and glutamate, is capable of scavenging free radicals either directly or enzymatically via glutathione peroxidase.

We can help body to “scavenge” or “neutralize” free radicals before they cause harm by avoiding environmental toxins as much as possible and increasing dietary antioxidant intake. Because antioxidant compounds are effective at very low concentrations, we can gain protection from even moderate dietary changes that increase antioxidant nutrients.

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13. What makes extra virgin pine nut oil such a powerful concentrate of antioxidants?

Extra virgin pine nut oil is a uniquely potent natural source of powerful antioxidants, as well as antioxidant cofactors and “building blocks”. First, it contains up to 56 mg/100 g of natural alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) – the most effective non-enzymatic antioxidant for terminating the chain reactions of lipid peroxidation in cell membranes. In its vitamin E content it is second only to wheat germ oil and Camelina oil. It is significantly richer in vitamin E than any other common vegetable oil (for example, extra virgin olive oil contains five times less vitamin E than extra virgin pine nut oil).

The next important group of antioxidant compounds present in extra virgin pine nut oil are carotenoids. Carotenoids are organic pigments occurring in plants and some types of algae and fungus. Their molecular structure makes them very efficient free radical scavengers, resulting in a powerful antioxidant effect. Some carotenoids fall into the category of pro-vitamin A. From them, our body makes retinol (vitamin A), which is a potent antioxidant itself.

Pine nut oil is a rich source of carotenoids, supplying about 30 mg/100 g of these antioxidant and pro-vitamin compounds. The fact that these carotenoids are dissolved in oil greatly increases their bioavailability to our bodies in two ways. First, the carotenoids are already released from the plant matrix (under certain circumstances, this release may be difficult, making carotenoids in some foods less usable compared to others), and, second, fat is a necessary cofactor for carotenoid uptake.

Another major antioxidant, glutathione, is synthesized by our cells from three amino acids: cysteine, glycine, and glutamate. Pine nut oil, rich in essential and non-essential amino acids, supplies all three of these glutathione building blocks. Therefore, it is also an important glutathione booster, capable of enhancing the free radical scavenging performance of this major antioxidant.

Finally, extra virgin pine nut oil is exceptionally rich in trace metal cofactors for enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. It contains 20 mg/100 g of zinc, 16 mg/100 g of manganese, and 4 mg/100 g of copper – all of them required for maximum efficiency of SOD. It also supplies about 19 mg/100 g of iron, an essential cofactor for both SOD and catalase. Consequently, pine nut oil not only provides our body with a potent boost of “external”, non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin E and carotenoids), but also reinforces and optimizes its own enzymatic potential for scavenging free radicals expressed through superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase.

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14. How much extra virgin pine nut oil should I take to alleviate ulcer- or gastritis-related abdominal pain and heal my gastritis or peptic ulcers?

For effective peptic ulcer/gastritis pain relief, healing and/or prevention, it is recommended to take at least 5 ml (one teaspoon) of extra virgin pine nut oil three times daily 30 to 60 minutes before a meal. For duodenal ulcers, it may be advisable to increase the dosage to 10 ml or more.

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Extra virgin pine nut oil, metabolism and digestion

15. What is cholecystokinin (CCK)? How does it enhance metabolism and assist digestion?

Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone produced in the small intestine in response to the presence of proteins and fats supplied by food. It is called a “satiety hormone” because it transmits a “full” signal to the brain and tells us to stop eating.

In addition to its role as a neurotransmitter, CCK is also a critical catalyst for the proper digestion of food in the intestinal tract. CCK does this by triggering the release of the digestive enzymes from the pancreas. In addition, it causes contraction of the gallbladder to deliver bile into the duodenum, and stimulates secretion of bile salts into the biliary system.

By ensuring the availability of bile salts and enzymes to properly break down large macromolecules into small molecules used by our bodies as all-important “building blocks”, CCK further enhances the overall performance of our metabolic and digestive systems.

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16. What is pinolenic acid (PNA)?

Pinolenic acid is a triple-unsaturated fatty acid which is a positional isomer of a more widely known gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Pinolenic acid is found exclusively in pine nuts and pine nut oil, and is not present in any other species of plants. This fatty acid is present in all 140 varieties of pine nuts (and their oil) in quantities ranging from 0.1 to more than 20 percent. However, the richest known source of pinolenic acid is the oil pressed from the seeds of the Siberian pine (Pinus Sibirica). It is this oil, containing up to 27 per cent of pinolenic acid, that the native Siberians use to boost their nutrient intake.

Scientists have demonstrated that pinolenic acid favorably affects total blood lipids, reduces platelet aggregation, and lowers blood pressure, contributing to cardiovascular health.

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17. What is the recommended daily dosage of pine nut oil required for optimizing digestion?

For best results, we recommend taking at least 15 ml (three teaspoons, or one tablespoon) of extra virgin, unrefined, cold pressed pine nut oil daily. The best way of taking the oil depends on your individual situation and goals. Experimentation and practical experience will be your best guides in working out a daily pine nut oil regimen that would be most effective for you.

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18. I do not need to lose any weight. I will be using the oil as a gastrointestinal remedy. Will it suppress my appetite?

Pine nut oil works as a natural hunger suppressant only in overweight individuals who are suffering from a satiety hormone imbalance resulting in a tendency to overeat. If you are not already overweight due to persistent overeating, it will not affect your appetite.

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©Copyright 2004-2016 Siberian Tiger Naturals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Note: Extra virgin pine nut oil, Sea Buckthorn oil and Camelina (wild flax) oil are foods. However, under certain circumstances they may be considered dietary supplements under US Law. With regard to those situations, the law requires us to make the following disclosure: "The information, products and statements (herein Contents) contained in this web site have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration. The Contents are not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease. The Contents are for informational purposes only and no claim is made to the accuracy or fitness for a particular purpose. The Contents should not to be construed as a substitute for treatment or professional medical advice. Your continued use of the Contents, constitutes your agreement to be bound by these Terms of Use. Any actions arising out of or in connection with the Contents are at your sole liability."